transdada

poetics, time, body disruption and marginally queer solutions

Sunday, October 10, 2004

Transgendered woman glad to be 'out'
Chabot College employee says people have reacted kindly
By Michelle Meyers, STAFF WRITER


HAYWARD -- (S)he was known as Bob McAllister.

A day later, she introduced herself publicly as Kari McAllister.

McAllister, 50, is the event coordinator for Chabot College's Performing Arts Center.

However, for most of her life -- whether working as a truck driver, running her own stereo repair shop or performing as lead singer in one of two rock bands -- "she" was actually a "he."




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Testimony by FannyAnn Eddy at the U.N. Commission on Human Rights
Item 14 – 60th Session, U.N. Commission on Human Rights


Distinguished members of the Commission,  
 
My name is FannyAnn Eddy and I am representing MADRE. I am also a member of the Sierra Leone Lesbian and Gay Association.

Distinguished members of the Commission,  
 
My name is FannyAnn Eddy and I am representing MADRE. I am also a member of the Sierra Leone Lesbian and Gay Association.  
 
I would like to use this opportunity to bring to your attention the dangers vulnerable groups and individuals face not only in my beloved country, Sierra Leone, but throughout Africa.  



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A young gay man's courageous letter
Lorri Ungaretti


Thirty-five years ago, my brother helped change history. On Oct. 24, 1969, Time magazine published a short piece under the heading "Behavior," describing homosexuals as "one of the nation's most despised and harassed minority groups."

It referred to a CBS poll of people's attitudes and to a report on homosexuality for the National Institute of Mental Health, which said that "such hostility is unjustified."



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Marriage amendment defeat stirs questions
By Cheryl Wetzstein
THE WASHINGTON TIMES


News that Louisiana's new constitutional marriage amendment had been overturned because it is too broad is reverberating in other states, where proposed amendments may be put to similar court tests.
    
At issue is whether voters can be asked to define what marriage is — and what it isn't — in the same amendment. Or, as a Louisiana judge ruled Wednesday, must voters be given separate ballot questions on other kinds of marriagelike unions.

    This question is being addressed in Louisiana, but it's likely to be raised in several of the 11 states that have constitutional marriage amendments on their Nov. 2 ballots.



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